If I snore, am I at risk of having Sleep Apnea?

One of the most common signs of sleep apnea is chronic snoring. It is estimated that there are approximately 15 million snorers in the UK, so how can you tell if you or your partner's snoring is something more serious like OSA?

Snoring is a very common symptom of the sleeping disorder called sleep apnea. It is believed that less than 1 in 3 sufferers take a sleep study to confirm their diagnosis of OSA. This is perhaps because they might be under the impression that because snoring is a very common condition, it is harmless and poses no further complications or threats to your health. Snoring is however one of the most overlooked conditions and can be a sign that you might be at risk of having sleep apnea, which carries serious health risks if left untreated.

15 million people in the UK suffer from snoring, so how can you tell if you or your partners snoring is a sign of a more serious condition such as sleep apnea?

Did you know that if you suffer from snoring, you might be at risk of a potentially life threatening respiratory condition called sleep apnea, if you leave the condition untreated.

Although snoring is one of the most common symptoms of sleep apnea, it is still possible to suffer from snoring, and not have sleep apnea. It is believed that snoring affects 40% of adults.

However, you should also take note that it is possible to have sleep apnea, and not suffer from snoring. Snoring is just one of the many major symptoms of sleep apnea to look out for.

Snoring is often a sign that you might be at risk of sleep apnea. Snoring is often a sign that you might be at risk of sleep apnea.

Generally if you suffer from chronic snoring, you are at risk of having sleep apnea so should therefore consider a sleep test to make sure that you are diagnosing your condition correctly. If you are concerned that you or your partner might be at risk of sleep apnea, then you might want to make a sleep diary to keep track of the symptoms you are suffering.

Other common symptoms of OSA that you should look out for include excessive daytime tiredness, choking or gasping for breath during sleep, breathing cessations during sleep, irritability, depression, anxiety and mood changes throughout the day.

If you or your partner are experiencing one or more of the symptoms above, then you might be at risk of having sleep apnea. If you are concerned that you might be at risk of sleep apnea, then you should take a sleep test which can either be done through the NHS, at a specialist sleep clinic, or by taking a confidential sleep study in the privacy of your own home.

It is believed that approximately 1 in 3 men and 1 in 5 women who are habitual snorers also suffer from some degree of sleep apnea!